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20121202
20121210
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Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
to connect. rethink possible. hours. nasa constructed this look at our little rock es >>> well, take a look at this. this is earth after hours thanks to nasa, they constructed this look at our little rock here using cloud- free night images from a new weather satellite. look at all the lights there. it's our best look yet at what our planet looks like when the lights are on. as one scientist said, unlike humans, the earth never sleeps. keeps spinning and keeps moving on. beautiful. >> love all these images coming out of nasa. >> we have a little football game tonight. >> no kidding. >> you want to talk about it? >> there's a big game tonight! i'm so excited. the raiders and the broncos. >> who are you rooting for? >> i'm -- who else would i root for? >> who are you rooting senator. >> who else would i root for? >>> the game will be dry if you plan to head out. cloudy skies but no rain this morning. going to keep things dry around the bay area for today. but all the raindrops left behind so we're seeing fog out there this morning. temperatures generally in the 50s outside. i think as we hea
sister te, the $8 million man, and nasa's high res look at you on our planet earth. "early today" starts right now. >> announcer: this is "early today" for thursday, december 6th, 2012. >>> good morning, everyone. i'm lynn berry. well, this week president obama put syrian leader bashar al assad on notice specifically about the use of chemical weapons, and now we know why. pentagon sources tell nbc news syria is preparing chemical weapons for their possible use against the syrian people in the form of aerial bombs. >> reporter: as the fighting grows more intense and syrian rebels close in on damascus, the syrian regime has turned increasingly desperate. u.s. officials tell nbc news the syrian military has now loaded the precursor chemicals for seron nerve gas into aerial bombs that could be dropped from dozens of syrian fighter bombers. this week u.s. intelligence detected a flurry of activity at chemical weapons site, like this one near homs. while u.s. officials confirmed the precursor chemicals are loaded and they must be mixed together to get the sarin gas. president obama and hillary
as well. they're the first women to become fully qualified submarine officers. nasa today gave us an unprecedented view of earth at night. it's a composite animation from hundreds of satellite pictures showing the lights of major cities, but also vast areas of darkness, especially in less developed parts of the world. remember this picture. lyndon johnson taking the oath after the assassination of president kennedy. one of the last eyewitnesses in the picture died last night, former texas congressman jack brooks. in his 42 years in the house, brooks not only witnessed history, he made it. he wrote the articles of impeachment against richard nixon. jack brooks was 89. making history and making music. we'll take five to remember jazz great dave brubeck next. ♪ captioning sponsored by cbs >>> finally tonight, dave brubeck was a jazz pioneer who kept his own kind of time. as a pianist and composer, brubeck challenged the standard musical cadence with exotic rythyms and styles. brubeck, who would have turned 92 tomorrow, died today. anthony mason takes "time out" to remember his work
with this electrifying night life, really spectacular views, of planet earth after dark. >> nasa just released these stunning images of earth at night, taking from a new satellite. you see dense clusters coming alive. and boats popping up along the nile river. >> there's big cities. light from middle east oil exploration. even wildfires in australia. pretty cool. >>> well, a new campaign that's meant to raise awareness about the deficit crisis, is getting lots of buzz. >> it calls on young folks to get serious about the deficit, and it stars former senator, alan simpson. >> stop instagraming your breakfast and tweeting your problems. and getting on youtube so you can see "gangnam style." >> he's got the moves. >> you go ahead, boy. >> 81-year-old alan simpson, right there, kicking it gangnam style. the can kicks back, a play on kicking the can down the road. that's simpson of simpson-bowles. >> that was the commission working to reduce the deficit. there's your commission chairman. whatever gets folks' attention, right? the work not in vain. there's your chairman. looking good, allen. break it
qualified submarine officers. nasa today gave us an unprecedented view of earth at night. it's a composite animation from hundreds of satellite pictures showing the lights of major cities, but also vast areas of darkness especially in less developed parts of the world. remember this picture. lyndon johnson taking the oath after the assassination of president kennedy. one of the last eyewitnesses in the picture died last night former texas congressman jack brooks. in his 42 years in the house, brooks not only witnessed history, he made it. he wrote the articles of impeachment against richard nixon. jack brooks was 89. making history and making music. we'll take five to remember jazz great dave brubeck next. ntly absorbed in small continuous amounts. citracal slow release continuously releases calcium plus d with efficient absorption in one daily dose. citracal slow release. i've been a superintendent for 30 some years at many different park service units across the united states. the only time i've ever had a break is when i was on maternity leave. i have retired from doing this one thi
space. nighttime view of the entire earth, released by nasa. but this is not the way the earth really looks. nasa had the composite images from satellites. they only show you what city lights, car lights, boat lights, auroras, things like that, even gas flames. they choose certain wavelengths and put this together. it's a beautiful view. it just came out. we thought we would bring it to you this morning. it's the way the earth should look. it's a cleaned-up version. we edit our pictures on facebook. >> not us. >> maybe. >> quick look at what the temperatures are doing today. these are some of the coldest temperatures we've seen so far this year. 21 degrees in new york. 21 in philly. look at the warmer air on the west coast. san francisco to l.a. sunshine from san francisco, sacramento, all the way to l.a. we'll give you the rest of the morning's weather in a moment. confessions of a serial killer. what he revealed about hiss deadly split personality. >>> and an abc news exclusive, the birth mother in that utah case speaks out. oh, it's great! now i can brew my coffee just the way i lo
while it exists from way up in space. nasa just released these pretty spectacular images of earth at night. taken from a new satellite. dense galaxy clusters come alive there in the dark. the remarkably detailed views even show brightly lit boats along the nile river. flames from mideast oil exploration and raging wildfires in australia. that is detailed. >> i think my kids night light in new york city showed up there too. >>> a look at your weather, everybody. rain, mountain snow in the northwest. a chance of showers, denver, des moines, ohio valley, scattered showers in the northeast. coldest air of the season for the northeast. bundle up. >> yes, 39 in boston. 42 in new york. 40s from detroit, to the twin city. pacific norlthwest. >> icicles in there. >>> this time of year the stories are great to see. the kind where people are giving gifts rather than buying them. what? altruism. >> even better when the gifts are given with nothing expected in return. in tennessee, an anonymous donor dropped 48, $100 bills into a red kettle outside a k mart in chattanooga. a note said please g
. kevin ford doesn't have to wait for nasa to release picture like that. he sees views from space every day. he is the commander of the international space station. just a warning before we start speaking, there's about an eight-second delay because we're transmitting a long way this morni morning. so is it morning or night up there, kevin? >> it's already afternoon on board the space station. and we've already done an almost what feels like to me a full day's work. i have a little bit more work after the interview right now. so right now we are in a night pass. we are in the northern hemisphere right now out over the pacific ocean. it's dark outside right now. we'll be in light in just a matter of about ten minutes. >> i was just going to ask you that. how can you tell the difference between night and day? because, you know, in my mind it's always dark up there. >> well, the -- space is dark but, of course, when we're on the sun side of the earth, we're in full lumination and have the reflection of the earth below us, beautiful blue earth and we're in daylight. only on the back side of
ending the war on drugs. sxwlirchlgts how nasa is protecting astronauts from radiation in space and how florians can actually cash in on invading pythons. we'll get right in. a job market being painted today. it's a picture that really is surprising a lot of folks. the labor department says that 146,000 jobs were added in november. that is almost double the 77,000 that economists were actually expecting. unemployment fell to 7.7%. that is the lowest level in nearly four years. christine romans is breaking it down. >> by now you've seen the headline, a stronger than expected jobs report for the month of november. let's look inside those numbers. you've got 40% of the unemployed have been out of work for six months or longer. that's called long-term unemployment. still something we got to work on. we need to get better next year. the underemployment rate 14.4%. those are the number of people who are out of work or are working part-time, but would like to be working full-time. people who are not fully, fully employed in the labor market. 14.4%. sometimes that's also called the real unemplo
at the joint press conference that nasa was carrying out in houston and moscow because it will, as you mentioned, be american scott kelly and the russian mikha mikhail kornienko. and this is a huge, huge first step. you can't underestimate it. if eventually there is going to be long duration flights to an astroid or on to mars, you not only have to have an understanding of the technical issues that you might face but what the body will go through over a course of year or two years in space. there just isn't enough of a baseline of information right now. so this is going to be hugely important. because, for instance, blood pressure goes down when you're on a long duration mission. you lose a lot of body mass and bone mass and muscle mass. the eyes change. there's an eye loss issue. eyesight loss issue that astronauts are facing coming back even from the duration of space flights they are doing now on the international space station. so a lot you have to understand about how the body is affected by weightlessness and also behavioral issues. if you and i go on this two-year mission, are w
've heard that. >> i've got a remote that's like a nasa computer i don't know how to use, but this apple tv remote has two buttons and does everything. >> it's so inexpensive, i can afford to buy it for both of you. >> it's 100 bucks or something. >> exactly right. >> and it's amazing. you can connect to netflix. it's great. >> but before we leave this tell me what you think, what changes might be coming at cnn? in other words, what's the challenge for cnn? >> i don't know. i think cnn has a great brand and is a great place and has really dedicated journalists. and like cbs, there's not a lot of places that, you know, have journalists working out on the field, and cbs is one of them, and cnn is, you know, the place is expanding with euros and that's important us to and that's in our dna. >> i worked for jeff zucker for many years. he said in taking over cnn that he wants to have more passion. do you think you can meet that bill? >> i think he has. >> i certainly hope so. i certainly hope so. look, there's a lot of passionate people there, and i think we've always d
apple. the remote, moat the most simpl remote like a nasa computer i don't know how to use, but the apple tv, easy to use. >> like $100. >> amazing. netflix and -- >> before we leave this, tell me how you think, what changes might be coming at cnn? in other words, what's the challenge for cnn? >> look, i don't know. cnn has a great brand, a great place and dedicated journalists, and like cbs, there's not a lot of places that have journalists worki ining in the field and cb one, cbs is one and cnn is a place expanding with bureaus. that's important to us and in our dna. >> i worked for jeff zucker many years. he says in taking over cnn he wants to have more passion. do you think you can meet that bill? >> i think -- i certainly hope so. >> look, a lot of passion in people there and i think, you know, we've always done well when things are happening and it's in the slower times that we've run into problems, and i hope we figure it all out. >> a big story in new york with the photographer who didn't help a man who ultimately was killed in a subway. you've been in predicaments,
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)